Nike’s Plus Size Mannequin Backlash

Nike recently unveiled a new plus-size line of athletic clothing and with it, a plus-size mannequin on which to display the clothing. Makes sense, right? A plus-size mannequin to display plus-size clothing.

One journalist, however, railed against this move as “promoting obesity.” In this Dietitians Unplugged episode, Aaron and I talk about the reaction to the mannequin, both good and bad, how promoting obesity is not actually “a thing”, and the role that internalized weight stigma may have played in this reaction.

Episode 60 – Nike Plus-Size Mannequin Does NOT Promote Obesity

Show notes:

I’m not linking to the original article because it’s pretty mean, and you can search the Tanya Gold/Nike article if you want to read it (it’s pretty easy to find). Instead, here are some great articles clapping back.

Telegraph’s Fatphobic Take On Nike’s Plus-Size Mannequins Receives Backlash

Nike’s plus-sized mannequins don’t ‘promote’ obesity – they reflect reality. Why on earth is that an issue?

The Real Issue With Nike’s Plus Size Mannequins

Dances with Fat: Nike’s Plus Size Mannequins Uncover the Truth About Weight Stigma

Study showing lower mortality in “overweight” category (referenced)

You are already sick enough with Dr. Jennifer Gaudiani

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In this episode of the Dietitians Unplugged podcast, we were thrilled to talk to Dr. Jennifer Gaudiani of the Gaudiani Clinic in Denver, CO which provides in-person and telehealth care to people with current or a history of eating disorders.

Dr. G is the author of the book Sick Enough, a Guide to the Medical Complications of Eating Disorders. She talked to us about her journey to becoming a HAES-aligned doctor, and how she realized that HAES is the only ethical way to treat patients, especially those in larger bodies. She explains her “house on fire” analogy which helps those who struggle to understand that they are already sick enough with their eating disorder and don’t need to delay treatment any longer. We think everyone will benefit from listening to this podcast – patients and doctors alike.

Listen now:

Ep 56 Jennifer Gaudiani
Episode 56 – Sick Enough with Dr. Jennifer Gaudiani

Show notes:

Gaudiani Clinic

Sick Enough, a Guide to the Medical Complications of Eating Disorders

The Rise of Fat TV: the Good, the Bad, and the Meh

tv-2213140_1280I’m a long-time TV fan but as I get older, my time is precious. I want to watch things that I find really entertaining. And with the rise of more fat representation on TV, there are more things for me to think about watching. But just because something includes a fat person doesn’t necessarily mean it will be a great show.

So in this episode, Aaron and I discussed the viewing options presented over the past year (thanks to streaming!) and offered up some criticism to help you in deciding what to watch. And it is summer after all, which, if you’re old enough, you remember as the time of summer reruns and trying to figure out what’s on that’s good (apparently this is no longer a problem, but nostalgia dies hard in my home).

In this episode, we talked about the TV show Dietland, based on the book of the same name by Sarai Walker, that aired last year on AMC and now streams on Hulu, and Shrill, which debuted this spring and runs on Hulu as well. We also mention a few shows with dubious fat representation that we have not and will not be watching (return of The Biggest Loser, Insatiable) for a variety of reasons.

Cover2Episode 59 – Fat TV Reviewed: Shrill, Dietland